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Guest Editorial

Intensively monitoring severely ill patients is like placing a smoke alarm in a burning building: it makes no sense. Smoke alarms only makes sense if they are placed in buildings before a fire starts,

Reduced kidney function, whether acute or chronic, is a highly significant biomarker of in most clinical settings. This is particularly true on the acute medical take where altered renal function is

The assumption would be that patients who are discharged from an emergency or acute medicine department have been thoroughly assessed and are good to return to the safety of their own home. An unplanned

Neutropenic Sepsis (NS) is a well recognised treatment complication, typically occurring 7-10 days following cancer cytotoxic chemotherapy. Colleagues in acute medicine will be only too familiar with

The increased demand for secondary healthcare services has led to overflow in emergency departments and acute medical units throughout the world. And, as all patients therefore cannot be seen at

Common risk stratification tools, e.g. for triage, fail in older patients. Some attempts have been undertaken to improve triage of older patients with nonspecific markers such as lactate with or without

In recent years we indeed have witnessed an increasing demand on healthcare services coupled with spiraling healthcare costs forcing us towards identifying factors and interventions leading to greater

Readers may be aware of the need to improve uptake of HIV testing in health care-settings to reduce the number of individuals with undiagnosed infection who later present with advanced disease. Late

In the acute care pathway, patients often need to move from home to hospital and for the majority, back again. This movement across care interfaces ensures that assessments and interventions are

Clinical diagnoses of sepsis that relate to bacterial infection were responsible for 650,000 admissions and 55,000 deaths in English hospitals last year. The vast majority of these patients are admitted